Paradise regained (1967-1986)/en

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inspired by a poem by Marsman

[1]

Opus 70

History

Version 1 (rejected)

  • The original version of this work was written by Legley in 1967[2] or 1968[3] at the occasion of his first grandchild David's birth, and was a composition for symphony orchestra.
  • The first performance took place in Liège on 21 November 1969, Paul Strauss leading the symphony orchestra of Liège.[4]

Version 2

  • Legley began work on the final version of Paradise regained on 13 February 1986 in Koksijde[5] and completed it in August 1986 in Koksijde. It is not merely a transcription for concert band, but a reworked version of the previous work.[6]
  • On 4 November 1986, the Royal Band of the Belgian Guides conducted by Norbert Nozy played this work for the first time in the big BRT concert studio [7] in Brussels.[8]

Music

Version 1

  • instrumentation: symphony orchestra[5][9]
  • duration: ca 7'

Parts

  • Allegro[5]
    • time signature: 4/4
  • Più vivo
    • time signature: 9/8
  • Poco meno mosso
    • time signature: 4/4
  • A tempo
    • time signature: 9/8
  • Adagio
    • time signature: 3/4
  • Allegro vivace
    • time signature: 5/8
  • Lento
    • time signature: 4/4
  • Het schip van de wind ligt gereed voor de reis [The ship of the wind lies ready for the voyage]
    • tempo: Maestoso (l'istesso tempo )
    • time signature: 4/4

Version 2

  • instrumentation: concert band
  • duration: ca 10'

Parts

  • Allegro
    • time signature: 4/4
  • Più vivo
    • time signature: 9/8
  • Subito molto più lento
    • time signature: 3/4
  • Allegro energico
    • time signature: 5/8
  • Het schip van de wind ligt gereed voor de reis [The ship of the wind lies ready for the voyage]
    • tempo: Lento
    • time signature: 4/4

Sources

  • autograph - version 2: Royal Conservatory Brussels (B-Bc), shelf number BV-03-4088
  • photocopy of the autograph - version 1: Royal Conservatory Brussels (B-Bc), no shelf number yet (Legley archive). Contains Legley's annotations preparing version 2[10]

Notes

  1. The original version of this work was dedicated to Legley's grandson David: voor de 0de verjaardag van David [for David's 0th birthday].
  2. Tessely, p.33.
  3. De Roeck, p.433.
  4. See:
    • J.M.: Auspices favorables pour les concerts du Conservatoire liégeois in Le Soir of 7 September 1969, p.5
    • Anonymous: A la radio in Le Soir of 21 November 1969, p.12
    • MAIREL, Jacques: Une œuvre de Victor Legley en création mondiale in Le Soir of 26 November 1969, p.7
    • De Roeck, p.434.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 See photocopy of the autograph - version 1.
  6. Legley writes in his autograph: N.B Dit is geen transcriptie van het vorige werk voor symphonieorkest. Het is een nieuwe compositie die het oude materiaal gebruikt. Dit werk vernietigt en vervangt het vorige. [N.B This is not a transcription of the previous work for symphony orchestra. It is a new composition reusing the old material. This work destroys and replaces the previous one.] Prior to the first page of the autograph, a page containing the following text has been glued: Paradise Regained, op. 70 was oorspronkelijk een symfonische schets naar het gedicht van H. Marsman. Dit nieuwe stuk voor harmonie-orkest is geen "bewerking" van het vorige; het is een totaal nieuwe compositie die hetzelfde muzikale materiaal gebruikt en tevens de eerste compositie vervangt. Het dateert van 1986. [Paradise Regained, op. 70 was originally a symphonic sketch inspired by the poem by H. Marsman. This new piece for concert band is not an "arrangement" of the previous one; it is a totally new composition reusing the same musical material and replacing the first composition as well. It dates from van 1986.]
  7. Presumably Studio 4 in concert hall Flagey.
  8. De Roeck, p.437.
  9. Piccolo, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, English horn, 3 clarinets, bass clarinet, 2 bassoons, double bassoon, 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, percussion, harp and strings.
  10. According to De Roeck (p.433), the autograph would have been in the archive that Legley's son kept. However, that archive was donated in 2011 to the library of the Royal Conservatory of Brussels, where this work is not present. Perhaps this manuscript has remained in the Legley family after all.